We are delighted to welcome Sir Simon Rattle and the Berliner Philharmoniker back to London for a landmark celebration at the Barbican and Southbank Centre.
Sir Simon has chosen to mark his 60th birthday with this major London residency which focuses on the music that means the most to him: a complete cycle of Sibelius symphonies in honour of the 150th anniversary of the composer's birth,
Mahler's Symphony No.2 and music by Helmut Lachenmann. The residency also includes the creation of a Young Orchestra for London, conducted by Sir Simon at both venues.
How to book

Young Orchestra for London

As part of The London Residency, Southbank Centre and Barbican Guildhall are bringing together 100 talented young musicians from London for a series of exciting performances with Sir Simon Rattle.

Rehearsals, which include masterclasses with players from the Berliner Philharmoniker and the London Symphony Orchestra, are well under way.

Follow the journey using #youngorchestralondon

Thursday 12 February, 6.30pm
Open Rehearsal in the Barbican Hall

Sunday 15 February, 3pm
Performance at Southbank Centre’s Clore Ballroom

Tue 10 Feb 2015, 7.30pm
Barbican Hall
Sibelius Symphony No.1
Sibelius Symphony No.2
Written in a period of oppressive censorship from Imperial Russia, Sibelius’s first symphony stands at the cusp of a tumultuous century, its soundworld as distinctive, sweet and heady as that of his great symphonic poem, Finlandia. A dialogue between light and shade, Symphony No.2 continues the composer’s quest for a native musical language and would be hailed as an emblem of Finnish independence.
Wed 11 Feb 2015, 7.30pm
Barbican Hall
Sibelius Symphony No.3
Sibelius Violin Concerto
Sibelius Symphony No.4
Leonidas Kavakos violin
Sibelius’s only concerto combines dancing virtuosity and deep melancholy. Written in Ainola, the composer’s beloved retreat, Symphony No.3 marks a musical turning point, its clarity and economy of expression a ‘crystallization of chaos’. In the Fourth Symphony, searing dissonances and translucent textures trace a volatile pattern of joy and foreboding, in material first sketched for a setting of Edgar Allen Poe’s The Raven.
Thu 12 Feb 2015, 7.30pm
Barbican Hall
Sibelius Symphony No.5
Sibelius Symphony No.6
Sibelius Symphony No.7
Written in a period of oppressive censorship from Imperial Russia, Sibelius’s first symphony stands at the cusp of a tumultuous century, its soundworld as distinctive, sweet and heady as that of his great symphonic poem, Finlandia. A dialogue between light and shade, Symphony No.2 continues the composer’s quest for a native musical language and would be hailed as an emblem of Finnish independence.
Sat 14 & Sun 15 Feb 2015, 7.30pm
Southbank Centre's Royal Festival Hall
Lachenmann Tableau
Mahler Symphony No.2 (Resurrection)
Kate Royal soprano
Magdalena Koženà mezzo-soprano
London Symphony Chorus
City of Birmingham Symphony Chorus
Composed a century apart, Mahler’s 85-minute Symphony No.2, Resurrection, and Helmut Lachenmann’s 15-minute Tableau share an intense engagement with the natural and imagined world. The alluring textures of Lachenmann’s virtuosic musique concrète instrumentale – vaulting brass, cross-hatched strings, darting woodwind and splintered metallic percussion – provide a prelude to the climax of The London Residency: a dramatic symphonic epic with Dies Irae plainchant, pastoral dance, teeming fish, a rose, a nightingale, primal light, off-stage brass, transcendent solo voices and a vast choir.